Category: Security

Practical Application: Implementing SSH security with TLS certificates

In any organisation of a large size managing access to servers and cloud resources is difficult.
There is often a tradeoff between convenience and security.
Changing these settings is also a bit scary in production as you can be locked out of your servers...

One solution mentioned by facebook engineering and smallstep is to make use of certificates to authenticate and authorise SSH users.

In this post we will look at what we need to achieve better SSH security and how to implement it...

What we need to know

The topics we should read up on are:

  • TLS certificates and public key cryptography
  • OpenSSL
  • Public Key Infrastructure (PKI)
  • SSH
  • Hashicorp Vault

Some books might be:

That is alot of reading.

Sources

Using django-oauth-toolkit for Client credentials Oauth Flow

I've been wanting to secure my api - so unidentified and unathorized parties cannot view, update, create or delete data.
This api is internal to the company and will only be used by other services - in other words no end users.
Hence the delegation of authorization need not happen and the services will be authneticating directly with the api.

That is why the Oauth client credentials flow is used - it is for server to server communication. (As far as I know)

There is alot of conflicting information on Oauth but in the RFC6749 on Oauth 2 Client credentials is mentioned:

1.3.4.  Client Credentials

   The client credentials (or other forms of client authentication) can
   be used as an authorization grant when the authorization scope is
   limited to the protected resources under the control of the client,
   or to protected resources previously arranged with the authorization
   server.  Client credentials are used as an authorization grant
   typically when the client is acting on its own behalf (the client is
   also the resource owner) or is requesting access to protected
   resources based on an authorization previously arranged with the
   authorization server.

Nordic API's: Securing the API Stronghold book mentions:

Oauth: It’s for delegation, and delegation only

I agree except when the client is the resource owner in the client credentials instance.
In that case surely there is no delegation?

Should we use it

What is the advantage over a basic auth or token authentication method?

It seems to just be an added step for the client but the key is that the token expires. So if a bad actor gets our token it will not last long before it is of no use.
The client id and secret is the thing that is used to generate tokend for future calling of the api.

Difference between Resource Owner Password Based flow and client Credentials

Django-oauth-tollkit provides both and their example uses the resource owner password based flow.
In both cases the resource owner is the client - so there is no delegation.

So what is the difference?

I checked on stackoverflow, and it turns out I was wrong.

In the resource owner client based way, the resource owner (end user) trusts the client application enough to give it it's username and password.
We don't really want this.

Implementing Client Credentials flow

Since users are not going to use the API and only services/clients will, I want to disable the other authorization flows and disable registering of clients.

I will manage the clients and they will be the resource owners.

So if you follow the information in the django-oauth-toolkit and setting it up for client credentials that should help

Permissions are significantly different from Django Permissions

What I found out durinng testing is that OauthToolkit implements it's own seperate permissions. So if you were wanting to use django model permissions (add, change, view and delete), you don't be able to.

Wait...I spoke too fast.

You can allow this with:

permission_classes = [IsAuthenticatedOrTokenHasScope, DjangoModelPermission]

However that means that you actually have to test with scopes if you expect a client to use it with Oauth and not django auth.

This is the view to use ClientProtectedResourceView

Generate a letencrypt ssl certificate for kong api gateway

So you have installed kong and you are ready for it to go into production. Whoops, nossl certificate yet? It is important that you add it as credentials will be moving between your gateway and credentials could be acquired by any party in between the client and your server.

But the standalone nginx plugin for cerbot does not work from my testing. As it is built on nginx, kong is not nginx.

Easiest Way is to Install Nginx

If Kong is running on port 80 then stop it: sudo systemctl stop kong

Install Nginx:


sudo apt install nginx

Install Certbot for nginx on your operating system

Get your certificates with the cert-only option:

sudo certbot --nginx certonly

When that completes it will tell you where your certificates and keyfile are:


Congratulations! Your certificate and chain have been saved at: /etc/letsencrypt/live/api.fixes.co.za/fullchain.pem
Your key file has been saved at: /etc/letsencrypt/live/api.fixes.co.za/privkey.pem

Add these locations to ssl_cert and ssl_cert_key respectively.
Also make sure ssl = on

Stop Nginx:


sudo systemctl stop nginx
sudo systemctl start kong

Remove nginx:


sudo apt remove nginx